Category Archives: Music news

loud women oz – launching June in perth and fremantle, WA

So excited that our beloved LOUD WOMEN, having started in a London pub 4 years ago, now has chapters across the US and Australia! The latter launches with a bang this June with our aussie mastermind Elle Cee dishing up two gigs to get things started down under …

The first is 8 June at The Bird in Perth, featuring:
Honestly , Oosterbanger , Tanaya Harper and HUSSY. Details here.

The next is 20 June at Mojos in Fremantle, featuring:
Cryot Girl , Grunge Barbie. JOYS and The Psychotic Reactions. Details here.

For the full scoop head to the LOUD WOMEN OZ Facebook group – and please tell your like-minded friends in Australia to do the same!

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LIINES: On and On – new music

Manchester’s LIINES are on fire right now. Having just hopped off a 30+ date tour with Sleaford Mods, and just about to embark on their own headline tour, they’re releasing a blinder of a new single, On and On, out Friday 24 May on Reckless Yes records next Friday 24 May. It’s a frenetic but ultimately satisfying 2 and a bit minutes of the driving dissonance that have made us weak at the knees for LIINES since they first graced a LOUD WOMEN Fest back in 2017. Sigh. Anyway. Here’s a sneaky peak of the new goodness:

On and On is LIINES’ first new material since releasing stunning album Stop-Start last May – it will be released digitally next Friday 24 May, via Reckless Yes. It can be pre-saved on Spotify and pre-ordered on bandcamp.


Catch LIINES live:

London (30 May, Thousand Island, upstairs at The Garage) – with Chorus Girl + Art Trip and the Static Sound
Nottingham (31 May, The Bodega) – with Pet Crow, I am Lono and Dacodac
Manchester (1 June, Yes) – with Blanketman and Pet Crow
Kendal Calling (Tim Peaks Diner)
Cotton Clouds Festival (Saddleworth, Tim Peaks Diner)
Confessional Festival (Blackburn).


Follow LIINES on: WEBSITE | FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAMSPOTIFY | SOUNDCLOUD | YOUTUBE

Jemma Freeman & the Cosmic Something – charity auction for ‘Helen is a Reptile’ limited edition vinyl, for Music Support UK

Jemma Freeman and the Cosmic Something ‘s latest single Helen is a Reptile is out now, and you can bid for a copy of a very special edition vinyl pressing in aid of a cause close to Loud Women’s hearts and minds, Music Support UK.

Each 7” single could be described much like a Masterchef dish as vinyl served three ways! Each disc has been hand lathe-cut in real time by Brightons 3.45 vinyl. There is a mixture of clear and black vinyl and the run out groove is engraved with Teabar records Berties’ catch phrase and mantra for life “Take it easy, but take it!”

The charity copies are available to bid for from Thursday 00:00 until 23:59 and the winners notified and announced on Friday 3rd May.

The band are raising money and awareness for Music Support –a registered charity founded and run by people from the UK music industry, for individuals in any area of the UK music industry suffering from mental, emotional and behavioural health disorders. Jemma says:

As a band we feel strongly about raising awareness and understanding of mental health issues on both a personal and structural level within music. It’s important the conversations about mental health can be continued and that practical help is available at the point of crisis and training given to help educate others. A lot of the content of the Cosmic Something deals with mental health issues, specifically Helen is Reptile which deals with intrusive thoughts and suicidal ideation. Members have benefited from the help of music charities to enable us to continue working as musicians so Music Support seemed like the perfect cause.

Auction rules:

  • There are ten 7” singles available to buy online via this blind auction
  • The ten largest bids submitted to the auction will be the winners
  • You can only bid once in this auction, but if you’re interested in buying multiple copies please  also say how many you’d like to buy at the price you bid. If your bid ends up in the top 10 we’ll try to accommodate your request for multiple copies, subject to availability.
  • Auction begins at midnight on 2nd May and ends at 23:59 (UK time) the same day. Bids received outside of these times will not be entered into the auction.
  • Send your bid to us in a private message via the JF&TCS Facebook page. All bids received via other means (public comments on fb posts, email, other social media, carrier pigeon) will not be entered into the auction. 
  • Bids must be placed in £GBP.
  • JF&TCS will keep the retail price of the single to cover manufacturing costs (£10), plus P&P expenses from each winning bid. The rest of the money bid will be donated to Music Support
  • All bids placed are binding commitments to pay the price bid for one copy of the 7” single. Please don’t bid more than you’re prepared to pay 
  • Winners will be notified as soon as possible via email after the auction ends. We’ll also send you a PayPal invoice for the amount bid so you can pay for your 7”.
  • The names of the winners will be published by JF&TCS in a FB post as soon as possible after the auction ends, once sales have been finalised (unless you prefer to remain anonymous – please let us know if so)
  • Good luck everyone!

See Jemma Freeman & the Cosmic Something’s Facebook page for bidding details.

Girl Germs podcast

Review by Caitlin Lydon

Legendary independent record label Kill Rock Stars have launched a podcast miniseries celebrating the 25th anniversary of Potty Mouth – the seminal album of Bratmobile. Separated into five bite-sized parts, Girl Germs charts the musical journey of Allison Wolfe, Erin Smith and Molly Neuman, who came together during the early days of Riot Grrrl – the underground feminist punk movement that defined much of the DIY music scene of the 90s.

For anyone already interested in the feminist punk scene of the 90s, mentions of the landscape where Bratmobile formed will already sound familiar, as references to Evergreen State College, the town of Olympia and the scene that surrounded Oregon at that time crop up continually to define the environment Bratmobile was born out of. From the first episode it becomes clear that there were no bystanders in the thriving punk scene of Olympia during this time, and to fit in you needed to be actively contributing and creating – whether it was setting up feminist art gallery like Reko Muse, creating zines to spread awareness of social issues and underground activists, or organising spoken word open mic nights. For Bratmobile, this meant starting a band and, as Molly Neuman explains, their band was pretty much as DIY as you could get – they learnt to play as they went along, decided to play their first gig with Bikini Kill as a dare, and recorded their debut album in 24 hours – which explains the unrestrained often primitive sounds that encapsulates much of Bratmobile’s music.

The story of Bratmobile in Girl Germs is punctuated by reflections not only from the band, but their peers and a generation of bands they inspired. Contemporaries such as Tae Won Yu of Kicking Giant reflects on the DIY elements of the band being a catalyst for a new way of making music, believing Bratmobile ‘changed what people thought was worth doing in punk rock’ by refusing to copy other bands to figure out the next steps to take, instead creating and honing a sound that seemed entirely unique to the current music scene.

Girl Germs tracks not only Bratmobile’s rise to fame, but the rise of Riot Grrrl in general – Corin Tucker of Heavens to Betsy speaks to this as she reminisces on her place in the scene, and the sometimes negative pressures that affected many women in the movement. Tucker explains that many Riot Grrrl bands were making music before bands like Nirvana broke, so the underground scene was something the media wasn’t often interested in – or worse still, something they trivialised entirely. Tucker reflects on her own efforts to distance herself from the Riot Grrrl scene, which often became a trap for women in punk music, to constantly only be asked what it’s like to be a woman in punk, not someone in a band making great music. And though the Riot Grrrl era is long gone, the idea of being a woman in a band as a novelty is still something that is perpetuated in much of the music industry today.

It’s important to remember the flaws and criticisms of the Riot Grrrl movement – by no means perfect, the scene was often rightly accused of not being diverse and inclusive enough, and fights within the scene itself about policing the right way to be a ‘Riot Grrrl’ is discussed in the podcast as being a major reason for Bratmobile’s initial break up on stage in 1994. This is worth noting, because the nostalgia that often surrounds these movements and scenes often does not reflect what the music scene actually needed, and still needs today – for all women to be part of the movement, for it to be any kind of movement at all.

From Riot Grrrl icons Bikini Kill announcing their first tour in over 20 years, to NME fronting an entire series of women in music nights using the ‘Girls To The Front’ tag line, the spirit of Riot Grrrl ethos captured so neatly in the Girl Germs podcast is clearly something that still has a huge relevancy in music industry today. Towards the end of the podcast, there is hope that the continuing legacy of Bratmobile will inspire more women and girls to pick up an instrument, claim their space, and whether they think they are ready or not, do it anyway.

Petrol Girls: The Sound – new music

Our alltime favourites Petrol Girls have just announced a new album coming out 24 May – Cut & Stitch – and they’ve released a banging first single here, ‘The Sound’, capturing the essence of DIY punk. We are just so into this. The band explain more:

We are not claiming our own music to define ‘The Sound’ – the track is more like an appreciation of sound as something that’s constantly evolving, and that everyone can use and develop in their own way. It’s a kind of manifesto for the political potential of sound… Make your own noise! Disseminate!’

The album Cut & Stitch is available to preorder now from Bandcamp.

Catch Petrol Girls live at Ladyfuzz Fest in Brighton on 3/4 May

The LOUD WOMEN Top Albums of 2018

The results are in! From nearly 100 nominations for LOUD WOMEN album of 2018, Team LOUD WOMEN has whittled a Top 20 from which we present the joint Top Five Albums of 2018 because frankly we can’t and won’t choose between them. (And if you want to skip right to the music, here’s a Spotify playlist of the winners to brighten up your afternoon!)

The 2018 LOUD WOMEN album of the year is therefore shared by five artists; and if that wasn’t enough we’ve inaugurated a spanking new LOUD WOMEN People’s Vote Readers’ Choice Award chosen by LOUD WOMEN readers themselves (who are clearly better at making decisions!)

Without giving too much way at this stage let’s just say that it’s been a good year for block capitals: here goes! 

The LOUD WOMEN Top Five Albums of 2018:

Big Joanie – Sistahs

With stellar gigs performed all over the London-based DIY scene that they call home and extensive radio play on shows like BBC Music Introducing, it’s been a big year for Big Joanie. The feminist punk trio have certainly ended 2018 with a bang thanks to the acclaim that’s already been given to their debut album Sistahs…By allowing their true feelings to be at the forefront of their songwriting, the band create tracks that truly empower the listener; not only to rebel but to check their own activism, to continue growing, and to do better. [Read full review here]

GUTTFULL – Tits and Nails

“An irrepressible sense of fun runs through Tits and Nails, in spite of everything its lyrics address. GUTTFULL has created a brilliant and uncompromising summation of the trials of being ‘other’ in 2018 and they’re ready to shout down their oppressors – with wit and with groove.” [Read more from this review]

ILL – We Are ILL

They write songs which are both silly and serious, and they attack them (as well as each other) playfully. You can make a case for pretension in art, but there’s none with ILL; like so many of the best bands they seem like a gang you’d love to join, but ILL go one better and make you feel like you’d be welcome: friendly if not quite family-friendly (unless the family in question is more Addams than Partridge, perhaps). … A perfect storm of enigma, whimsy and controlled violence, and a genre-straddling state-of-the-nation address. With added bear growls. [Read more from this review]

LIINES – Stop/Start

‘Long-awaited’ might be a cliché, but in the case of LIINES‘ debut album, it’s a fitting description for a band that’s evolved steadily from fin-de-siecle Manc post-riot grrrl stalwarts Hooker: the tightest, heaviest rhythm section in DIY supports Zoe McVeigh’s emotional vocals and haiku-like songwriting, together conjuring an atmosphere of taut, claustrophobic menace like a UK postpunk time capsule. [Read more from this review]

Sink Ya Teeth – Sink Ya Teeth

A perfect ten tracks of no wave-disco electropop on a brilliant debut album from this Norwich duo. Described by The Guardian as “Thrillingly chilly, perfectly funky, no-wave straight out of early 80’s NYC…except that Sink Ya Teeth are a duo from Norwich. In a different era they’d have been all over TOTP” 4/5

The LOUD WOMEN People’s Vote Readers’ Choice Award:

The Menstrual Cramps – Free Bleedin’

The Menstrual Cramps is an anti-capitalist feminist band, therefore expect direct attacks on Tories, Neo-Nazis, big brands, business owners, famous idols who shouldn’t be idols anymore, and of course, “boyz-who-will-be-boyz”. The songs are so catchy that half of the album will get stuck in your head after giving one listen to the whole album. They produce music rapidly, though diligently. This rapidity actually shows itself in the guitars as fast riffs, playful strokes and abrupt small silences and it just sounds so good and steady. [Read more from this review]

The Top Twenty in full:

  • Big Joanie – Sistahs
  • The Breeders – All Nerve
  • Colour Me Wednesday – Counting Pennies in the Afterlife
  • Doe – Grow Into It
  • Dream Wife – Dream Wife
  • ILL – We Are ILL
  • GUTTFULL – Tits and Nails
  • Gwenno – Le Kov
  • The Menstrual Cramps – Free Bleedin’
  • Fightmilk – Not With That Attitude
  • LIINES – Stop/Start
  • Janelle Monae – Dirty Computer
  • Muncie Girls – Fixed Ideals
  • Grace Petrie – Queer As Folk
  • Screaming Females – All At Once
  • She Makes War – Brace For Impact
  • Shopping – The Official Body
  • Sink Ya Teeth – Sink Ya Teeth
  • Skinny Girl Diet – Ideal Woman
  • The Twistettes – A Strange Play

LOUD WOMEN NYC is GO!

START SPREADING THE NEWS!

So so SO excited to announce the launch of the new LOUD WOMEN NYC chapter’s first gig, at Brooklyn’s The Well – with Basic Bitches and I, Doris confirmed so far, more TBA soon! This will be a night to remember – tell all your NYC friends! Event link here!

cadyThe new LOUD WOMEN NYC group has been set up by Cady Siregar, a musician we got to know through her awesome band Spare Rib, and also through a magazine she set up, Girl Fiend. In her own words:

I’m a transplant of the London DIY scene now living in NYC and I’m keen to start a Big Apple leg of LOUD WOMEN, and to build and grow a New York-based community of great female & non-binary musicians. I’m eager to start organising regular LW gig nights in the city with some amazing women-led bands. I’d also love some help with running the group and putting on events and reaching out to bands so if you’d like to join, please reach out! I’d love to put our first gig on sometime early in the new year.

it’d also be great for this to be a group for women looking to start and join bands, so we can form thousands of bands and then take over the world. 🆒.

***PLEASE ADD PEOPLE*** to the group who you feel would like to be involved, be it anyone who’d like to help organising events / musicians / bands / anybody wanting to start a band but needing that extra push / anyone & everyone who would like to be involved, period!
🤙🏽 peace out xxx

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