Tag Archives: gaptooth

Advent Galendar Window no.12 – Gaptooth

Window number 12 of the LOUD WOMEN Advent Galendar is creaking open, and who’s that snooked up inside there?

It’s Gaptooth!

LWgal12

Gaptooth – aka Hannah Lucy – is awesome! She wowed us at this year’s LOUD WOMEN Fest, not only by playing a brilliant punk pop set, but also creating artwork for the Fest poster, and helping out stewarding on the day. She’s a true DIY sister and we love her to bits!

We’re proud to have hosted her recent blog Stop asking female musicians for their stories of sexism in the music industry and premiers for her videos Terminal 4 and They Cut We Bleed . Can’t wait to see what this multi-talented superstar produces in 2018! Find her on Facebook

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Video: Gaptooth (feat. Sisters Uncut) drops ‘They Cut We Bleed’ – LOUD WOMEN exclusive

gaptooth1Gaptooth feat. Sisters Uncut
‘They Cut We Bleed (Gaptooth Music)
Worldwide release date: 01.12.17

The new single from East London-based electro artist Gaptooth (aka Hannah Lucy) is filled with feminist rage against government austerity measuresThe track, ‘They Cut We Bleed’, is a tribute to feminist direct action group Sisters Uncut, who have become famous for their protests against life-threatening cuts to services for survivors of domestic violence.

 

“In the UK, two women a week are killed by a partner or ex-partner, but the government is cutting funding for refuges, legal aid, social housing – all services that survivors rely on,” says Lucy. “Across the country, the first services to shut down have been those set up for women of colour and LGTBQ+ survivors, while many migrant survivors are denied the right to access refuges at all. This is a matter of life or death. Theresa May has made a show of being tough on domestic violence, but is taking away lifelines for people trying to escape it.”

gaptooth 3‘They Cut We Bleed’ is the second single taken from Gaptooth’s forthcoming second album, due out next year. It follows the Pillow Fort EP (2016), a  selection of guitar-fuelled electro-pop tracks with a feminist bent, and her debut album Connections/Departures (2013), described by Everett True as full of big blowsy choruses and tricky couplets that recall the heady days of Republica… joyous, infectious pop music from East London.

All proceeds from the single will be donated to Sisters Uncut (www.sistersuncut.org).

Find Gaptooth on: BandcampFacebookTwitterInstagram.


Sisters Uncut is made up of women and non-binary people, many of them survivors of domestic violence or support workers who see the impact of the cuts first hand. They have been described by Vice as “Britain’s most radical direct action group”, and are best known for storming the red carpet at the Leicester Square premiere of the film Suffragette. ‘They Cut We Bleed’ features samples of protest chants, recorded in summer 2016 when Sisters Uncut took over an empty council flat in Hackney for nine weeks to highlight the lack of safe housing available for survivors fleeing domestic violence.

In May this year, Sisters Uncut took over the visitor’s centre at the recently closed Holloway Prison for a week to demand that the land be used as a women’s centre. The site – formerly a women’s prison – was once used to imprison suffragettes, who staged a hunger strike there in their fight for women’s right to vote. More recently, Sisters Uncut have been protesting a decision by Tower Hamlets Council to turn Hopetown Hostel, one of East London’s last women-only hostels, into a men’s hostel. Domestic violence is one of the leading causes of homelessness among women, yet residents say the council are forcing survivors to move into mixed accommodation with men. Sisters Uncut are asking people to sign a petition to keep the Hopetown open, retaining all of its women-only hostel beds, and for investment in social housing and support services for women and non-binary people.

Key stats:

Stop asking female musicians for their stories of sexism in the music industry

gaptooth 3by Hannah Lucy

In the wake of #metoo, the Harvey Weinstein scandal and many other disclosures of sexual harassment and assault committed by men in the entertainment industry, media, politics and basically everywhere, journalists have been asking female celebrities whether they, too, have experienced gendered abuse and violence.

Some reporters are even acting as though survivors somehow owe them their stories.

While the current level of publicity around this is new, the practice of expecting women to recite experiences of sexism for public consumption is not, and it’s one female bands and artists are familiar with. “Have you ever experienced sexism in the music industry?” has become almost a standard questions to female musicians in interviews, not to mention the many requests from editors to provide a quote or even write a piece about it for their publication.

Privately, many women grumble to each other about these requests. It’s not that there aren’t important conversations to be had about this subject. There is absolutely more to be said – especially about the experiences of women of colour, disabled women, queer women, trans women, working class women and others who experience intersecting oppressions. But sometimes these questions feel like yet another example of the problem they are supposedly trying to address. So I’ve put together a handy list of questions to ask yourself before you call on female musicians to recount their experiences of sexism in the music industry.

What are you trying to achieve?
Contrary to popular belief, women have been speaking up about their experiences of sexism for a long, long time. Often, it doesn’t seem to change anything – whether because people don’t believe us or just don’t care enough to change their behaviour. For some women, sharing their experiences can be part of the healing process, and we should absolutely support them in doing that, especially if it’s at their initiative [i.e.: not yours]. But if sharing our stories hasn’t ended sexism yet, will your blog containing yet more descriptions of abuses of power really bring about the changes we need?

Remember, when you ask about ‘sexism’, you’re asking about everything from casual comments or unconscious bias to physical and sexual violence. Sharing these stories can be exhausting, re-traumatising and put as at risk of retribution. So ask yourself, is it worth it? Instead of asking us to keep proving that there’s a problem, could you write a piece about what needs to be done to fix it, or about projects supporting women in music?

Do you see us as artists, or just as women?
One of the most depressing things about these requests is that sometimes it feels like journalists are more interested in publishing our tales of harassment to titillate their readers than they are in, y’know, writing about our art. Have you asked me about my songwriting process, my production techniques, what kind of guitar pedals I use? Or only about my gender?

What are you giving back?
What journalists often seem to forget is that you are in a position of power over us. If we want to get the word out about our music, we need you. Especially lesser-known artists. We want you to like us, and that puts pressure on us to try to meet your requests, even if they make us uncomfortable. Think about this before you ask your question. Acknowledge it. Then tell us, how will you use your power to help us? Are you paying us for our labour? Are you covering our work? Boosting it on social media? If you’re not offering anything in return, using your power to ask people to regurgitate experiences of oppression because you need #content might not be a great move.

Have we already had this conversation?
The chances are, many female bands or artists have already shared stories of sexism. Before you ask us to recount difficult and painful experiences, remember that Google is your friend and see whether there’s something already out there that you can quote. Jessica Hopper’s 2015 crowdsourcing of stories is a good place to start.


Have you got your own house in order?
Does your website/magazine/blog etc. give equal coverage to female bands and artists? Do you have female editors, writers, photographers, illustrators? Have you checked that your reviews don’t go on about a male collaborator when a woman did most of the work, or use patronising language about women? If you’re called out for sexist content on your site or social media, do you get defensive, quietly delete it or do you own it and state publicly how you will do better in future? What about your comments section – are you dealing quickly with misogyny and making it a welcoming place for female readers?

Really?
Seriously, you might not be calling us b*tches and c*nts, but sexism often comes in much more subtle and unconscious forms. If you’re not continually trying to improve your own work, your request for our stories might come across as expecting women to do the labour to make you appear ‘not sexist’. That, one might just argue, is a prime example of sexism in the music industry.

Hannah Lucy

@gaptoothmusic

www.gaptoothmusic.co.uk

 

LOUD WOMEN at Matchwomen Fest ’17

What an awesome day we had yesterday at the Matchwomen Festival. LOUD WOMEN was honoured to be part of the event, helping to put together the evening’s music, following a day of truly inspiring women speakers. Highlights of the day, for me, included Diane Abbott and Shami Chakrabarti, both such warm and engaging women; and Nina Malik from the Freedom Programme, gave a heartbreakingly personal account of survival from abuse.

The music from our LOUD WOMEN kicked off with Gaptooth, aka Hannah Lucy, who gave an explosive performance of her biting feminist keytar pop. Her songs are dancy and clever and funny and endearing. Really excited that this talented woman is joining us for LOUD WOMEN Fest in September.

Gaptooth
Gaptooth

Next up was The Menstrual Cramps, who were playing their second ever gig (their first being LOUD WOMEN on International Women’s Day this year). This awesome band of young feminist punks are just so exciting – they’ve grown hugely in confidence during the last few months, and gave a slick performance which won them a room full of devoted new fans. Catch them next at Who Run the World’s birthday party on 13 August at the Fiddler’s Elbow.

The Menstrual Cramps
The Menstrual Cramps

Next up was Thunder on the Left. Agonisingly, we never got to see this awesome band play last night, due to horrendous technical problems caused by the venue (more on that later, but suffice to say for now we would not be recommending anyone book the London Irish Centre for live music events in future!). We apologise profusely to the band and the people who’d come to see them. We’ll get Thunder on the Left back on a LOUD WOMEN bill very soon – watch this space.

Finally, we were treated to a mesmerising set from Ms. Mohammed. She opened with her stunning hit ‘Alibi’, which had become the anthem for the Matchwomen Festival. Watching this exquisitely polished new popstar close up felt like a very special treat – can’t wait to see what’s next from her.

Ms Mohammed
Ms Mohammed

Big thanks so Louise Raw for getting us involved with her brilliant festival!

first view: Gaptooth drops ‘Terminal 4’ video

12239184_10153451044138439_1290487586737579622_oLOUD WOMEN are proud to present the exclusive first view of ‘Terminal 4’. Following her 2016 release Pillow Fort EP, East London-based Gaptooth (aka Hannah Lucy) returns with a new single, the first from her forthcoming second album‘Terminal 4’ is an emotive electro-pop track, with a more personal feel than some of her usual politically-charged output.

“The song was inspired by going back to places that have strong feelings attached to them, like the house I grew up in, or visiting cities I used to live in,” says Lucy. “It’s about the idea that as we move through the world we give meaning to the places where we make important memories – even mundane places like street corners and train stations. I liked the idea that we’re continually making a personal map of our emotional lives, and that specific places have the power to take us back in time, whether we like it or not.”

The single was self-produced by Gaptooth and mixed at Dreamtrak Studio in Hackney by Oli Horton, who has previously worked with Foals, Cymbals, Teeth and Chicks On Speed. The animated video for the track was produced by Horrorize Studios, while the B-side features a cover of The Magnetic Fields’ 1991 cult classic ‘100,000 Fireflies’.

Gaptooth will play festivals in the UK this summer, including Something Else Sista Fest in Oxfordshire on 9-11 June, the Matchwomen Fest in London on 1 July and of course LOUD WOMEN Fest in London on 2 September, with more to be announced shortly.

LOUD WOMEN Fest line-up announced!

We received nearly 300 applications from awesome grrrl bands and singing wimmin to play our Fest, so it was a gut-wrenching task to sift down to this final list … we’ve had to say no (this time, at least) to some amazing acts, but I’m sure you’ll agree that the final list the panel of Team LOUD WOMEN arrived at is the perfect mix of exciting, talented, new, beloved, varied, amaaaazing and above all LOUD WOMEN!

On the main stage:                     On the bar stage:

Hands off Gretel                               Sink Ya Teeth
Petrol Girls                                       Baby Arms
The Twistettes                                  Lilith Ai
Dream Nails                                      Gaptooth
GUTTFULL                                        Grace Savage
LIINES                                               Velodrome
PUSSYLIQUOR                                Lea Andrews
The Baby Seals
Party Fears
Beverley Kills

Earlybird £10 tickets are available NOW for a limited time only, from WeGotTickets

Hands Off Gretel