Tag Archives: gaptooth

Gaptooth: 5 question interview

Photo by Keira Anee

Gaptooth is our very favourite electro-riot-indie-popstar and she’s coming to play our Christmas party on 14 December at the Hope & Anchor (come!). In the meantime, we asked her 5 questions …

1.     What have you been up to since we last saw you (at LOUD WOMEN Fest 4!)?

Well the main piece of news is that my second album, Sharp Minds, Raised Fists was released in October, so I’ve mainly been busy doing press for that. Doing PR is my least favourite thing about releasing music but it’s really nice to have it out there in the world finally for everyone to hear. The response so far has been great!

2.     What can we look forward to from you on 14 Dec?

Our usual combination of shouty feminist rants, slightly chaotic musicianship, keytar stylings, distorted guitars and dancey electronic beats. And one song from the new album that’s turned out to be a fan favourite but which we haven’t played live yet. It will be the day after the General Election results so we’ll probably be either drunkenly celebrating or drunkenly commiserating. Oh, and we’ve also got sparkly Christmas outfits.

3.     You’ve got a band now! How’s that working out? More fun? More logistics to work out? Change in your sound?

All of the above! Playing electronic music live is difficult as a solo act because you end up having to have quite a lot of stuff pre-recorded. Bringing in Kim and Georgia as guitarists has made a massive difference in terms of the punkier sound but also bringing much more energy to the live set. My new album is a lot more guitar-driven than the last one so having live guitarists makes it sound much more powerful.

4.     What are your plans for 2020?

Gigs! We’re playing for Get In Her Ears on 13th March with Ghost Car, The Other Ones and Minimals, and we have one or two out of town gigs in the works as well as applying for festivals in the summer. I’ve been intending to scale things back a little bit because I really need to finish my PhD thesis (!) but I’m already having vague ideas of maybe releasing another single or two…

5. Have you been naughty or nice this year? What’s top of your Christmas list?

The state would say naughty, my cats would say nice. What I’d really, really like Santa to deliver is a Labour majority in Parliament and Jeremy Corbyn in Number 10. Failing that, new socks.

Come and see Gaptooth and her band on 14 December, along with I, Doris and friends at the Hope & Anchor

Gaptooth: Sharp Minds, Raised Fists – LP REVIEW

Reviewed by Tony Rounce

“Peer assessment”. A practice they employ at my teenage daughter’s school, where she and her classmates are called upon to mark each other’s work.  And something I now find myself doing with “Sharp Minds, Raised Fists” – the latest album from Hannah Lucy p.k.a. Gaptooth. 

Y’see, when she’s not being Gaptooth, Hannah is a fellow member of Team Loud Women. Which could’ve been a bit tricky for me, if I hadn’t liked the album. Fortunately I do. Very much so. And I suspect that I am not going to be the only one to speak of it in glowing terms this month.

In a live environment, Gaptooth is a band. But on record (well, CD and download) it’s basically all Hannah, apart from some very occasional assistance with guitar parts. You may have caught Gaptooth’s set at Loud Women 4 recently. If you did you could not have been anything other than mightily impressed with Hannah’s pithy, funny, intelligently crafted lyrics, sung in her own attractive ‘London’ voice, and the immediate ear-friendliness of her tunes. Now you can relive them in the comfort of your own home. It’s my recommendation that you do so, and as soon as possible.

The absence of ‘real’ instruments on “Sharp Minds” does not detract from the excellence of the repertoire, the high quality of Hannah’s writing, or the strength of her poptastic melodies. Its dynamic opener ‘Post-Patriarchy Disco’ raises the bar for feminism in music, while the quite brilliant near-closer ‘Why I Left You Outside Pizza Express’ will resonate with anyone who has ever felt pressured to be half of a romantic partnership, just because everyone in their circle of friends expects them to.

In between there are 8 more songs that deal with harassment (‘Red Flags’ aimed at a sleazebag who is “Toxic, And Not In The Britney Sense”), confrontation (“I’m Going To Mention The Unmentionable”) anxious self analysis (“Did I State My Case? Did I Do My Best?” worries the central character of ‘Rewind And Replay’), domestic and ethnic violence (the sample-driven ‘They Cut, We Bleed’, here in two impressive mixes) and much more besides. All of them demanding your attention, and all of them more than worthy of it.

There isn’t room to examine each song in detail, but if you want just one highlight to sell you on the album I have the very thing right here. ‘Mixtape Song’’s ultra-poignant memoir of a youthful, bygone romance literally had me reaching for the Kleenex. I would imagine most of us will have had (or will at sometime have) ‘the relationship’ that we look back on with wistfulness, and wonder how the other person’s life has progressed since.

“Though I Never See You Now
I Still Believe In Certain Bonds That Never Break
So Send Me Your Co-Ordinates
I’m Making You A Tape.”

Haven’t we all at least wanted to do that for one person at least once? Kudos (and then some) to Hannah for articulating the sentiment so beautifully.

Photo (c) Keira Anee Photography

Bright and brash, filled with songs that any of our top tunesmiths would be proud to put their names under the titles of, “Sharp Minds, Raised Fists” comes to you with the 100% emphatic endorsement of this particular Loud Woman. I enjoyed it so much that I immediately purchased a physical copy of the CD from Bandcamp, even while I was reviewing it here from the sound files there. And what’s more I fully intend to follow up by investing in as much of Gaptooth’s back catalogue as I can lay my hands on, as quickly as I possibly can.

Now that IS positive “Peer Assessment” for you….

“Sharp Minds, Raised Fists” is available via Bandcamp right now. Hannah promises that Gaptooth will be playing more gigs in early 2020 if not before. Follow them on Facebook for all upcoming Gaptooth news.

Photos courtesy of and reproduced with kind permission.

Gaptooth: Pre-LOUD WOMEN Fest 5 Question Interview

Gaptooth aka Hannah Lucy is a returning favourite to LOUD WOMEN Fest – having played at our 2nd Fest, and worked as a steward on all of our Fests! A brilliant musician, talented visual artist, staunch activist, and all-round lovely friend – we are so pleased Gaptooth is playing this year’s Fest on 14 September. Don’t miss her – 3pm on the Boston Music Room stage. Here’s her pre-Fest 5 Question Interview.

1. For people who’ve not seen you play live before, what can we expect from you at LOUD WOMEN Fest?

I make feminist electro-pop with a riot grrrl vibe. I normally play solo but I’ll have two guitarists, Georgia and Kim, joining me on stage for the first time.

If you know my records, this will be a bit heavier and punkier.

2. Fill in the blanks …

Our sound is like the lovechild of Le Tigre and Yeah Yeah Yeahs with a bit on the side from The Faint.

3. Give us your artist manifesto in no more than 20 words.

Destroying capitalist white supremacist hetero-patriarchy with beats you can dance to.

4. Who are you most looking forward to seeing play at LOUD WOMEN Fest?

I’m really looking forward to seeing Lilith Ai, as I saw her play at LOUD WOMEN Fest 2 and she was amazing. I also love her artwork and her videos – she is multitalented.

5. What made you want to play at LOUD WOMEN Fest?

As an artist, a festival like LOUD WOMEN brings together a supportive, feminist audience in a way that you don’t get with many other events. As a fan it’s a source of hidden gems – I’ve been to every Loud Women Fest since the first one and every year I’ve discovered new bands and artists that I love.

Gaptooth: Post-Patriarchy Disco – video premiere

We’re excited to premier the video for new Gaptooth song ‘Post-Patriarchy Disco’! The track – which appears on our very own LOUD WOMEN: Volume Two compilation (pre-order it now!) is taken from Gaptooth’s forthcoming second album Sharp Minds, Raised Fists, due out 11 October.

The video features some familiar faces from the LOUD WOMEN community, including Petrol Girls, Miss Eaves and I, Doris.

Gaptooth – aka Hannah Lucy – had this to say about the song:

“’Post-Patriarchy Disco’ imagines the massive fucking party we’ll throw when we finally overthrow the patriarchy. I wrote it as a tribute to some of the incredible, unstoppable feminist activists I’ve had the honour of organising with in recent years, and I wanted to capture the sense of empowerment and solidarity that comes from working together to achieve radical political goals.”

To celebrate the video release, Hannah has also produced a selection of disco-themed ‘Liberation Now’ badges and stickers available on her Bandcamp page. You can get a download of ‘Post-Patriarchy Disco’ here when you pre-order Sharp Minds, Raised Fists.

Catch Gaptooth live at LOUD WOMEN Fest 4 on 14 September – see the full line up and get your tickets here.

LOUD WOMEN Volume Two compilation album: track listing revealed

Drumroll please as we can finally announce the full 22 track listing for the hotly-anticipated LOUD WOMEN Volume Two compilation album, which will be launched 14 September 2019 at LOUD WOMEN Fest 4!

1The FranklysNot Guilty
2The TxlipsThe Lost One
3I, DorisThe Girl From Clapham
4The Menstrual CrampsNo Means No
5The CleopatrasForty
6LIINESNever Wanted This
7PussyliquorMy Body My Choice
8Pleasure VenomHive
9ARXXIron Lung
10Ms MohammedNever Again
11The Baby SealsIt’s Not About the Money, Honey
12Peach ClubNot Your Girl
13T-BitchFrighty Nighty
14Jemma Freeman & The Cosmic SomethingSomeone Else to Blame
15Jelly CleaverYarl’s Wood
16Secondhand UnderpantsThe Anthem
17GaptoothPost-Patriarchy Disco
18Vaginas, What Else?Loose Tile
19GGAllan PartridgeI Feel Lobe
20HurtlingDon’t Know Us
21Personal BestRadio
22Bridget HartLet Loose Lucy

The CD is available to pre-order now for just £5 from our Bandcamp page – and as a thank you for pre-ordering, when the CD releases after 14 Sept we’ll also send you a copy of Volume One! So that’s 42 of the loudest of loud women, all for a cheeky fiver.

Praise for LOUD WOMEN Volume Two:

“Scabrous riffs, inventive songcraft and full force in-your-face woman power from all bands involved. Loud Women festival shows up the mainstream by exhibiting the very best of women in rock.”

– Paula Frost, Vive Le Rock

“LOUD WOMEN are inspiring social change”

– Kerrang!

At a time of toxic masculinity in the industry, platforms like Loud Women are a brilliant, and brazen, beacon of hope shining a floodlight on marginalised musicians. Turn it up LOUD.

Cheri Amour, Soho Radio / She Shreds magazine

LOUD WOMEN rock!

DJ John Kennedy, Radio X

LOUD WOMEN Fest 4 – final lineup revealed!

14 Sept 2019 at London’s Dome and Boston Music Room looks set to see the biggest (and best?) LOUD WOMEN Fest yet! Here’s the news we’ve been dying to tell you for months … our final* lineup, in no particular order …

Plus afterparty DJs, food, zines, records, and all manner of fun things we’ve not even thought up yet – get in touch with us on loudwomenclub@gmail.com if you’d like to get involved!

Earlybird tickets are now sold out but you can still grab regular advanced tickets from here.

*I mean, as final as anything is that could possibly have slight changes here and there in cases of sickness, injury, best friends throwing last-minute weddings, that sort of thing. But pretty damn final I’d say!

LOUD WOMEN Fest 4 – second wave lineup announcement!

Ridiculously excited to let you know the next 8 bands to make up our 20-strong lineup for LOUD WOMEN Fest 4! Drumroll please …

Joining us on Saturday 14 September at The Dome and the Boston Music room will be …

  • The Baby Seals
  • Personal Best
  • Pleasure Venom (USA)
  • Gaptooth
  • GGAllan Partridge
  • The Cleopatras (Italy)
  • Nervous Twitch
  • and The Samba Sisters

These awesome eightsome are in addition to the lovelies we have already announced, namely:

  • ARXX
  • Hurtling
  • Peach Club
  • Secondhand Underpants (Turkey)
  • The Txlips (USA)
  • The Menstrual Cramps

Which means that right now our lineup looks like this!

Best fest yet already … and there are still 6 more acts to announce!

Grab your earlybird tickets now:

Advent Galendar Window no.12 – Gaptooth

Window number 12 of the LOUD WOMEN Advent Galendar is creaking open, and who’s that snooked up inside there?

It’s Gaptooth!

LWgal12

Gaptooth – aka Hannah Lucy – is awesome! She wowed us at this year’s LOUD WOMEN Fest, not only by playing a brilliant punk pop set, but also creating artwork for the Fest poster, and helping out stewarding on the day. She’s a true DIY sister and we love her to bits!

We’re proud to have hosted her recent blog Stop asking female musicians for their stories of sexism in the music industry and premiers for her videos Terminal 4 and They Cut We Bleed . Can’t wait to see what this multi-talented superstar produces in 2018! Find her on Facebook

Video: Gaptooth (feat. Sisters Uncut) drops ‘They Cut We Bleed’ – LOUD WOMEN exclusive

gaptooth1Gaptooth feat. Sisters Uncut
‘They Cut We Bleed (Gaptooth Music)
Worldwide release date: 01.12.17

The new single from East London-based electro artist Gaptooth (aka Hannah Lucy) is filled with feminist rage against government austerity measuresThe track, ‘They Cut We Bleed’, is a tribute to feminist direct action group Sisters Uncut, who have become famous for their protests against life-threatening cuts to services for survivors of domestic violence.

 

“In the UK, two women a week are killed by a partner or ex-partner, but the government is cutting funding for refuges, legal aid, social housing – all services that survivors rely on,” says Lucy. “Across the country, the first services to shut down have been those set up for women of colour and LGTBQ+ survivors, while many migrant survivors are denied the right to access refuges at all. This is a matter of life or death. Theresa May has made a show of being tough on domestic violence, but is taking away lifelines for people trying to escape it.”

gaptooth 3‘They Cut We Bleed’ is the second single taken from Gaptooth’s forthcoming second album, due out next year. It follows the Pillow Fort EP (2016), a  selection of guitar-fuelled electro-pop tracks with a feminist bent, and her debut album Connections/Departures (2013), described by Everett True as full of big blowsy choruses and tricky couplets that recall the heady days of Republica… joyous, infectious pop music from East London.

All proceeds from the single will be donated to Sisters Uncut (www.sistersuncut.org).

Find Gaptooth on: BandcampFacebookTwitterInstagram.


Sisters Uncut is made up of women and non-binary people, many of them survivors of domestic violence or support workers who see the impact of the cuts first hand. They have been described by Vice as “Britain’s most radical direct action group”, and are best known for storming the red carpet at the Leicester Square premiere of the film Suffragette. ‘They Cut We Bleed’ features samples of protest chants, recorded in summer 2016 when Sisters Uncut took over an empty council flat in Hackney for nine weeks to highlight the lack of safe housing available for survivors fleeing domestic violence.

In May this year, Sisters Uncut took over the visitor’s centre at the recently closed Holloway Prison for a week to demand that the land be used as a women’s centre. The site – formerly a women’s prison – was once used to imprison suffragettes, who staged a hunger strike there in their fight for women’s right to vote. More recently, Sisters Uncut have been protesting a decision by Tower Hamlets Council to turn Hopetown Hostel, one of East London’s last women-only hostels, into a men’s hostel. Domestic violence is one of the leading causes of homelessness among women, yet residents say the council are forcing survivors to move into mixed accommodation with men. Sisters Uncut are asking people to sign a petition to keep the Hopetown open, retaining all of its women-only hostel beds, and for investment in social housing and support services for women and non-binary people.

Key stats:

Stop asking female musicians for their stories of sexism in the music industry

gaptooth 3by Hannah Lucy

In the wake of #metoo, the Harvey Weinstein scandal and many other disclosures of sexual harassment and assault committed by men in the entertainment industry, media, politics and basically everywhere, journalists have been asking female celebrities whether they, too, have experienced gendered abuse and violence.

Some reporters are even acting as though survivors somehow owe them their stories.

While the current level of publicity around this is new, the practice of expecting women to recite experiences of sexism for public consumption is not, and it’s one female bands and artists are familiar with. “Have you ever experienced sexism in the music industry?” has become almost a standard questions to female musicians in interviews, not to mention the many requests from editors to provide a quote or even write a piece about it for their publication.

Privately, many women grumble to each other about these requests. It’s not that there aren’t important conversations to be had about this subject. There is absolutely more to be said – especially about the experiences of women of colour, disabled women, queer women, trans women, working class women and others who experience intersecting oppressions. But sometimes these questions feel like yet another example of the problem they are supposedly trying to address. So I’ve put together a handy list of questions to ask yourself before you call on female musicians to recount their experiences of sexism in the music industry.

What are you trying to achieve?
Contrary to popular belief, women have been speaking up about their experiences of sexism for a long, long time. Often, it doesn’t seem to change anything – whether because people don’t believe us or just don’t care enough to change their behaviour. For some women, sharing their experiences can be part of the healing process, and we should absolutely support them in doing that, especially if it’s at their initiative [i.e.: not yours]. But if sharing our stories hasn’t ended sexism yet, will your blog containing yet more descriptions of abuses of power really bring about the changes we need?

Remember, when you ask about ‘sexism’, you’re asking about everything from casual comments or unconscious bias to physical and sexual violence. Sharing these stories can be exhausting, re-traumatising and put as at risk of retribution. So ask yourself, is it worth it? Instead of asking us to keep proving that there’s a problem, could you write a piece about what needs to be done to fix it, or about projects supporting women in music?

Do you see us as artists, or just as women?
One of the most depressing things about these requests is that sometimes it feels like journalists are more interested in publishing our tales of harassment to titillate their readers than they are in, y’know, writing about our art. Have you asked me about my songwriting process, my production techniques, what kind of guitar pedals I use? Or only about my gender?

What are you giving back?
What journalists often seem to forget is that you are in a position of power over us. If we want to get the word out about our music, we need you. Especially lesser-known artists. We want you to like us, and that puts pressure on us to try to meet your requests, even if they make us uncomfortable. Think about this before you ask your question. Acknowledge it. Then tell us, how will you use your power to help us? Are you paying us for our labour? Are you covering our work? Boosting it on social media? If you’re not offering anything in return, using your power to ask people to regurgitate experiences of oppression because you need #content might not be a great move.

Have we already had this conversation?
The chances are, many female bands or artists have already shared stories of sexism. Before you ask us to recount difficult and painful experiences, remember that Google is your friend and see whether there’s something already out there that you can quote. Jessica Hopper’s 2015 crowdsourcing of stories is a good place to start.


Have you got your own house in order?
Does your website/magazine/blog etc. give equal coverage to female bands and artists? Do you have female editors, writers, photographers, illustrators? Have you checked that your reviews don’t go on about a male collaborator when a woman did most of the work, or use patronising language about women? If you’re called out for sexist content on your site or social media, do you get defensive, quietly delete it or do you own it and state publicly how you will do better in future? What about your comments section – are you dealing quickly with misogyny and making it a welcoming place for female readers?

Really?
Seriously, you might not be calling us b*tches and c*nts, but sexism often comes in much more subtle and unconscious forms. If you’re not continually trying to improve your own work, your request for our stories might come across as expecting women to do the labour to make you appear ‘not sexist’. That, one might just argue, is a prime example of sexism in the music industry.

Hannah Lucy

@gaptoothmusic

www.gaptoothmusic.co.uk